Mt. Pierre Elliott Trudeau (Meadows)

Mt. Pierre Elliott Trudeau (Meadows) (#14 on hiking map)

  1. Difficulty: Medium/Hard difficultymost
  2. Warnings: No official warnings, however, the area is slated for a future resort development so please inquire with the Valemount Visitor Centre for the latest update.
  3. Wheelchair accessible: No
  4. High-clearance 4×4 advised to access trailhead? Although one can access  the trailhead  without a 4 x 4, a high clearance vehicle is recommended as the road can have large ruts.
  5. Best seasons: Summer (late June-Sept)
  6. Distance (return meadows): 6.4 km/4 mi
    Distance (return peak): Data not available
  7. Approx. time: 4–5 hrs return (meadow)
  8. Elevation gain: 425 m/1400 ft (meadow)
  9. Steepest grade: 35% or greater in parts
  10. Viewpoints: Mountain views, view of waterfall, meadows and alpine lake.
  11. Geocache points Not known
  12. Closest bathroom/outhouse: Visitor Info Centre
  13. Cell service? Not comprehensive, but in spots.
  14. Gear to bring: Bring 1–2L water/pp and lots of mosquito spray (water is available for the most of the hike-filtering recommended) and bear spray
  15. How to access/where to park: From the Visitor Info Centre, head south on Hwy 5 (towards Kamloops). Approx. 3.5 km south, take a right at the intersection and Click here for Google Map directions. The access road was fixed up in summer 2015 and is now good for most vehicle types.
  16. Best Parts: The payoff for this hike is big – a gorgeous meadow with a creek, lake and waterfall. Plus, if you climb up the waterfall you’ll get a view of Mt. Robson and the bottom of the valley. From the meadow you will have a view of the waterfall, the Summit and behind you Mount Robson.
  17. Worst Parts: There are some very steep sections that are hard to grip unless you’re wearing good hiking shoes. When the trail is wet the steeper sections can be muddy and slippery. The sub-alpine meadow has boggy sections all summer. Hiking poles are recommended. Watch out: Grizzly bears are sometimes spotted foraging in the meadow during spring and summer. Be sure to make lots of noise so you don’t surprise them and they have time to leave to avoid an encounter. The mosquitoes are very bad during the summertime due to the lush environment – mosquito spray and a net shirt, with a net cap and long sleeves and pants are a MUST.
  18. Outside Links: 1) BC Rec Sites and Trails Map
    2) Steven’s Peak Bagging (hiking blogger) 3) TrailPeak Website 

Trail Description:

The payoff for this hike is big – a gorgeous meadow with a creek, lake and waterfall. Plus, if you climb up the waterfall you’ll get a view of Mt. Robson and the bottom of the valley. It’s a long drive on the access road to get there, and a very steep climb, but the hike up to the first lake is only 2 hours and the scenery is spectacular. The mosquitoes are fierce in June and July though, and it’s pretty wet and boggy in the meadows. Grizzlies are sometimes spotted here. It is a wild and beautiful place.

*For those more adventurous you can ascend beside the steep waterfall to the green hued alpine lakes or continue on to the summit. For more information please contact Joe Nusse 

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Elevation change profile (metres and km). Click to expand.

Trudeau Meadows Elevation Map

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GPS Zone:

Trailhead coordinates: 52.833921°, -119.385940°
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